Why did Anil Laul feel brick size shouldn’t be standardised?

Why did Anil Laul feel brick size shouldn’t be standardised?

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Anil Laul-min

Anil Laul-min
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Anil Laul, Indian architect and author of Green is Red, Low-cost low-energy sustainable green buildings

Anil Laul is perhaps one of the earliest proponents of green architecture in its truest sense. Though he never pursued for Green ratings for any of his projects, all of his works were acknowledged and were recognised from foreign lands for their sustainability.

Anil Laul who passed away in 2016, promoted green buildings based on low cost, low embodied energy using the local materials. He was a member of INTACH, and advisor to HUDCO and Delhi Urban Arts Commission, who also co-authored many housing policies of several states of India. He received several awards for his projects listed as UNCHS Good Practices. He founded “Anangapur Building Centre” (ABC) at Faridabad to promote alternative to high energy consuming construction technologies with high embodied energy of green-certified buildings that are built with high-end materials. The Anangpur Building was started to cater to the needs of the common man as well as to promote the use of cost-effective technology in the higher income sector.

He also authored a book “Green is Red” with an intention to tell what makes the buildings green in real sense. He was very critical about the the term Green Buildings/Construction and the way it was perceived by the people. According to him, Green Building had become a fashion statement. The book was written after making years of thorough research about the subject.

Being a radical thinker of green materials he always believed that brick should not be standardised. Do you know why?

He was of the opinion that the architects and the engineers often commit the mistake of standardising the use of materials instead of rationalising them. According to him, brick is a universal building material and it should never be standardised since its size must be in response to the nature of the locally available clay. Bricks are made out of locally available clay and clay of different regions differ in quality and strength and therefore, the brick size should be different.