It pays to be disorderly

It pays to be disorderly

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According to a study conducted by MIT and National Center for Scientific Research and some other researchers, cities with an orderly pattern have a much greater urban heat island effect than those with a more disorderly pattern. The study found that the arrangement of a city’s streets and buildings plays a crucial role in the local urban heat island effect, which causes cities to be hotter than their surroundings.

It pays to be disorderly -min

It pays to be disorderly -min
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Some cities, such as New York and Chicago, are laid out on a precise grid, like the atoms in a crystal, while others such as Boston or London are arranged more chaotically, like the disordered atoms in a liquid or glass. The researchers found that the crystalline cities had a far greater buildup of heat compared to their surroundings than did the glass-like ones. The team found that using mathematical models that were developed to analyze atomic structures in materials provides a useful tool, leading to a straightforward formula to describe the way a city’s design would influence its heat-island effect.

The researchers adapted formulas initially devised to describe how individual atoms in a material are affected by forces from the other atoms, and they reduced these complex sets of relationships to much simpler statistical descriptions of the relative distances of nearby buildings to each other. They then applied them to patterns of buildings determined from satellite images of 47 cities in the U.S. and other countries, ultimately ending up with a single index number for each called the local order parameter ranging between 0 (total disorder) and 1 (perfect crystalline structure), to provide a statistical description of the cluster of nearest neighbours of any given building.

The differences in the heating effect seem to result from the way buildings reradiate heat that can then be reabsorbed by other buildings that face them directly, the team determined. Especially for places such as China where new cities are rapidly being built, and other regions where existing cities are expanding rapidly, the information could be important to have. In hot locations, cities could be designed to minimize the extra heating, but in colder places the effect might actually be an advantage, and cities could be designed accordingly. This study also suggests that research on construction materials may offer a way forward to properly manage heat interaction between buildings in cities historical downtown areas.