Sabz Burj to undergo renovation

Sabz Burj to undergo renovation

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Sabz Burj to undergo renovation -min

Sabz Burj to undergo renovation -min
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Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC) and Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) have joined hands, and conservation work at the site has already started. Renovation work is expected to be complete by the end of 2018 as the artisans have already started putting in place glazed tiles in two shades of blue, green and yellow on the drum of the tomb

Oldest double-domed monument in the heart of old Delhi, Sabz Burj, is all set to be renovated. For this purpose, Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC) and Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) have joined hands, and conservation work at the site has already started. Renovation work is expected to be complete by the end of 2018 as the artisans have already started putting in place glazed tiles in two shades of blue, green and yellow on the drum of the tomb. Usage of modern tiles have been deliberately avoided and instead locally made and hand compressed tiles are being used for the tomb. Apart from restoration work, the tomb is expected to be illuminated by Havells India Limited, which has joined hands with AKTC and ASI.

The 22-metre high Sabz Burj, at the intersection of Mathura Road and Lodhi Road, is the victim of pollution, traffic and accompanying vibrations. Restoring the missing sandstone lattice screens, filling up the cracks on the dome and stabilizing the foundation are some of the major works which will be undertaken during the year-long restoration work.

Though “Sabz Burj” in English means ‘Green Dome’, the color of the tomb is now blue. This is because the tomb is covered in blue tiles due to a restoration error done in the 20th century. It is a protected archeological monument of Delhi. The construction was influenced by Central Asian architecture, which consists of alternating wide and narrow sides. Entrances have been built into the wider sides, while the narrower sides are ornamented in a pattern of incised plaster, paint or glazed tile.