Water level rising in Hampi, part of it drowned

Water level rising in Hampi, part of it drowned

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Almost all of the monuments were built between 1336 and 1570 CE during the Vijayanagara rule. The architecture is built from the abundant local stone; the dominant style is Dravidian, with roots in the developments in Hindu arts and architecture in the second half of the 1st millennium in the Deccan region

After 1565 Battle of Talikota, perhaps this is the biggest threat Hampi group of monuments are facing as the flood waters have drowned most of the area. With authorities releasing over 1.70 lakh cusecs of water from a reservoir yesterday morning the world heritage site Hampi along the banks of Tungabhadra River in Ballari district has been inundated.

Water has entered the UNESCO heritage site Hampi, the erstwhile capital of Vijayanagar empire known for its rich architecture, while an Anjaneya temple in front of the Kampli Fort has partially submerged.

Flood in the locality is unlikely to recede soon as discharge from Tungabhadra dam is set to be increased further.

However, till now the extent of damage to the heritage structures are not known and it can be assessed only when the flood water recedes.

Hampi is a UNESCO World Heritage Site located in east-central Karnataka, India. Located in Karnataka near the modern-era city of Hosapete, Hampi’s ruins are spread over 4,100 hectares (16 sq mile) and it has been described by UNESCO as an “austere, grandiose site” of more than 1,600 surviving remains of the last great Hindu kingdom in South India that includes “forts, riverside features, royal and sacred complexes, temples, shrines, pillared halls, mandapas, memorial structures, water structures and others”.

Almost all of the monuments were built between 1336 and 1570 CE during the Vijayanagara rule. The architecture is built from the abundant local stone; the dominant style is Dravidian, with roots in the developments in Hindu arts and architecture in the second half of the 1st millennium in the Deccan region. It also included elements of the arts that developed during the Hoysala Empire rule in the south between the 11th and 14th century such as in the pillars of Ramachandra temple and ceilings of some of the Virupaksha temple complex. The architects also adopted an Indo-Islamic style in a few monuments, such as the Queen’s bath and Elephant stables.